Help Me With

Emergency Dentist

Are you in pain and need emergency services?

Dental emergencies can include toothache and dental injuries like missing teeth, because they’ve been knocked out during sport. Other dental emergencies can include fractured teeth, fillings or facial swelling.

Dental Injuries

Some dental emergencies are more common than others. Losing a tooth is one of the most common dental emergencies and can often happen in an accident or sporting injury. Eating hard food is commonly known to cause a chip or break in your tooth and you need emergency dental treatment. It’s also common to suffer trauma to your mouth in an accident and need emergency care. 

      Common Emergency Symptoms

      It’s always important to take notice of any unusual symptoms in your mouth. The most common signs of a dental emergency are:

      • Toothache or sudden tooth pain
      • Swelling around your jaw or mouth

      In any dental emergency, you should book in to see a dentist as soon as possible.

      FAQ

      Never Deleted

      What can I do to help with the pain from a dental injury?

      If you’re suffering from toothache from a dental injury you should visit a dentist as soon as you can. If you can’t get in to see a dentist immediately after the accident or injury there are ways you can help manage the pain. Using pain relief medication will help to ease the pain. Using cold compresses and ice to bring down the swelling will also help manage pain. 

      What should you do if a tooth falls out?

      A lost tooth is one of the more common dental emergencies. If a tooth is knocked out, it’s very important to act quickly.

      If your child has lost a baby tooth don’t put it back in the socket. This can damage the new permanent tooth underneath.

      For adults, recover your tooth but do not touch the tooth at the root. While it may be difficult, make sure to only handle the crown part of your lost tooth to avoid any additional damage. Rinse the tooth using water, milk, or a saline solution to clean it. If you’re using saline solution make sure it’s sterile. Don’t wipe or scrub the tooth, just gently rinse off the root and crown. You can try to put your tooth into the empty socket. At the very least this will help keep the root protected. Hold the tooth in place by gently biting down on medical gauze or soft fabric as the pressure from you biting on it will prevent it from moving too much. If reinserting the tooth doesn’t work, place the tooth in a glass of milk or saline solution. Water won’t work for preserving your tooth as you go to a dentist or doctor. If you don’t have any milk or saline solution, place the tooth in your mouth between your cheek and gums.

      The faster you get to a dentist, the better chance you have of saving your tooth. If a dentist is unavailable, go straight to a hospital emergency room. Make sure to bring your tooth with you so they can try to reinsert it.

      What do you do if you fracture, chip or break a tooth?

      Regardless of how damaged the tooth is, you should seek dental advice immediately. Then reposition the tooth if you can, using very light finger pressure, and hold it in place with a moist tissue or gauze. Try to find any broken or chipped away pieces and rinse them with milk to remove any dirt. If you can’t find the missing piece of tooth, contact your dentist immediately. Depending on how damaged the tooth is your dentist may be able to repair it.

      How can you prevent a dental emergency?

      Not all dental emergencies can be prevented. However you can take measures to prevent injuries to the teeth and mouth, especially when playing sports. We offer a service to build custom-made mouthguard that will prevent the chance of suffering an oral injury. Avoiding really hard foods such as hard lollies and biting ice can prevent non-sports related injuries. It is also important to never use your teeth to cut items, or open packets – this is why scissors were invented.

      Book your appointment today!